Evernew Appalachian Set Review: Ethereally light

At 161g complete, Evernew’s Appalachian pot set is certainly a minimalist titanium marvel. But there’s more to camp life than skimming weight. So how does it perform?

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If you have yet to try an alcohol stove, you really should put one on your short list. With their basic designs, low weight, and unmatched simplicity, there is nothing to break, maintain, or repair. They are easy to ignite, impressively fuel efficient, and the fuel itself is not only ubiquitous, but cheap. For years the alcohol stove market has been dominated by a handful of stalwart offerings which have largely gone unchanged for decades. New products are few and far between, which is what makes the Evernew Ti Appalachian alcohol set so appealing.

One of the finer attributes of any alcohol stove system is the low weight and the Evernew system is if anything, ethereally light. The titanium burner alone clocks in at just 34 grams. When paired to the Ti DX pot support structure, adding only an additional 52 grams, and including the 500ml Ti Ultralight Mug/Pot at 74 grams, the whole system tips the scales at just 161 grams.

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Like all uber-light things, it’s not enough to just present a low gram count. Any stove, regardless of weight, still has to perform. The Appalachian Set is without a doubt a star performer. Boil times, although variable due to ambient temperature, humidity, and altitude, are impressively quick. Alcohol stoves are easily thwarted by mild breezes, and the Appalachian does better than expected in those conditions thanks to the smart design of the two-piece wind shroud. Naturally, it does best with as much wind protection as possible, but on its own, it does admirably as long as it’s just mildly breezy.

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It’s always the details that make a good product even better and this is true of the Appalachian. A small ridge at the base of the pot is designed to nest within the inner edge of the DX pot support. This gives the system superb stability. No more wobbly pot or the portent of spilled fluids. The pot itself is extremely well made with a pair of fold-out handles and a sturdy, well designed lid. The small pour spout, a seemingly benign addition, gives extra control when dispensing hot liquids. It’s those little things that matter, like the small vent hole in the lid to again, facilitate a steady pour.

Adding to the Appalachians’ convenience, everything packs away neatly in the 500ml pot with room to spare. I place a small pack-towel inside my pot to silence rattles when using the stove off my bicycle.

Wrap Up

The Appalachian is a wonderful stove, one I fully intend to make a permanent part of my traveling kit. For the solo traveler, or used as a backup system, it’s tough to beat.

  • WEIGHT161g (5.67oz)
  • PRICE $130
  • PLACE OF MANUFACTURE Japan
  • CONTACT Evernew America

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  • mikeetheviking

    This a very nice set up! Stability of this design was a concern for me, glad to hear it’s not wobbly. I can vouch for evernew quality (see my evernew 1.9L non-stick pot below). Special note regarding the evernew spirit burner pictured: This stove has rave reviews all over the internet (i have not been able to use it myself) It is good to know this stove actually uses a wicking material that is not visible much like the comparable trangia burner. This is not advertised by the manuf. but good to know. I would consider this stove an upgrade from the trangia burner because it us MUCH lighter and will not develop hairline cracks after many uses like trangia burners are famous for.

  • Sean Parchem

    Christophe, I’ve been so interested in an alcohol stove for years. This is going to sound so newbie regarding them, but what types of alcohol do you burn? Can you buy any “type” off the shelf and use it for fuel? I love my JetBoils and they aren’t broke and don’t need fixing but…… this is a tiny bit smaller for the bike packing rig.

  • Denatured alcohol – here’s a helpful link on what that is exactly:
    http://thru-hiker.com/articles/fuel_alcohol_choices.php

  • Sean Parchem

    Thanks Colin. Appreciate the help.

  • lnarachi

    I have this set and can attest to its great performance. You can also use the two-piece stand without the alcohol burner and use pieces of wood as fuel as an alternative. Typical of many Japanese outdoor products, it is well-designed.

    One disadvantage of an alcohol stove is the lack of heat control – it is basically burning at 100% until it runs out of fuel (which is how you “turn it off” – blowing it out is dangerous and not recommended).

    This lack of temperature control is a consideration if you wish to pan fry, saute, etc. . You can use a double boiler to moderate the temp for the top pan/lid while boiling water below, but with other types of stoves, you can simply turn down the flame by adjusting fuel flow.

    You also can’t keep boiling pot after pot of water – it doesn’t hold enough fuel for that. It will burn long enough to easily boil a full Vargo 900 ml BOT pot of water before it runs out.

    You need to wait until the stove cools before refueling.

    All of these disadvantages isn’t due to this brand or design, this is the nature of all “minimal” alcohol stoves.

    The Evernew kit is also pricey, perhaps because it is made in Japan and not China. The build quality is excellent, which makes me believe this is a lifetime purchase as long as you don’t crush it, due to the thin titanium stock used to manufacture the stove stand/windscreen . The pot and the burner is heavier stock.

    I wished Evernew would of coated the pot handle like they coated the pot lid handle. They get too hot to use with your bare fingers after boiling water. I use my cycling gloves.

    With all that – I still recommend this kit – especially if you are a weight conscious. It is a perfect back-up kit – I also make use of this as part of my ‘go-bag’ for emergencies (Earthquake, fire, etc).

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