Bedrock Entrada Review: the strapping handlebar bag

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Bedrock’s Entrada Handlebar Bag with Pocket is a medium sized handlebar rollbag, built to tackle the roughest of backcountry bikepacking…

To be honest, it took me a few goes at setting up the Entrada to really get the hang of things. But the more practise I’ve had, the more I’ve appreciated its design. After all, there’s a lot going on. Double back webbing straps mount the Entrada to the handlebar. Dry bag style closures seal it off either end, coupled with a lateral compression system to keep the roll snug and tight. The accompanying front Pocket has adjustable velcro tabs that wrap around the handlebars, while the main straps loop round the body of the bag to support it, using a buckle that locks into place to prevent any slippage.

But what you lose in terms of setup speed, you certainly gain in stability. When packed well and cinched down tight, the Entrada feels like it’s glued to the handlebars. The fact that it’s also compressed means it retains its shape really nicely, even after a day of rough riding.

Bedrock Bags Entrada Handlebar Bag review

  • Bedrock Bags Entrada Handlebar Bag review
  • Bedrock Bags Entrada Handlebar Bag review

The Pocket is my favourite aspect of the bag. Having bust innumerable zippers over the years, I love the origami style folding flap that serves to both keep dust and water at bay, and allow for speedy, one handed access while I’m riding. The opening is massive, and inside, there’s ample room for day to day sundries – or even a couple of camera lenses, which is what I’ve been using it for.

Bedrock Bags Entrada Handlebar Bag review

  • Bedrock Bags Entrada Handlebar Bag review
  • Bedrock Bags Entrada Handlebar Bag review
  • Bedrock Bags Entrada Handlebar Bag review

In terms of sizing, the Entrada is roughly equivalent to a medium Revelate Sweetroll – it’s around 6.5in (16.5cm) wide, 20in (51cm) in circumference, and 21in (53cm) in length, once folded a few times at either end. Bedrock quote the capacity at around 11L. But despite its modest dimensions, I was amazed by what I could cram in there; the compression system really helps make the most of its capacity. In terms of realworld packing, I squished in my 32F sleeping bag, down pants, down jacket, merino layer, thick wool socks, wooly hat, gloves and a Thermalite Reactor liner. It’s certainly roomy enough for late summer and autumnal riding, but on the small side for winter outings or long distance tours. If you’re running a suspension fork though, particularly on a small frame, it could well be just the right size. Note that there’s also a drop bar specific version, which is 5in narrower, and an inch wider. And if you’re looking for color coordination, there’s a few options you can choose from.

  • Bedrock Bags Entrada Handlebar Bag review, Jones Plus
  • Bedrock Bags Entrada Handlebar Bag review, Jones Plus
  • Bedrock Bags Entrada Handlebar Bag review, Jones Plus

Incidentally, I tried the Entrada on the Jones Plus, and it worked perfectly wedged in front of the truss fork. The adjustable velcro tabs can easily be adjusted to hook around the ‘loop’ of the Jones Loop H-bar – see images above.

Bedrock Bags Entrada Handlebar Bag review

  • Bedrock Bags Entrada Handlebar Bag review
  • Bedrock Bags Entrada Handlebar Bag review

Given that the seam is on the underside and the material used – Dimension Polyant VX21 – has a waterproof membrane between two protective layers, I’d expect the Entrada to shrug off all but persistent heavy rain. For guaranteed waterproofing, it can be coupled a 10L dry bag – Bedrock recommend Seal Line’s Cirrus Drysack. Due to the bag’s slim profile, I found it easier to pack the drysack directly in the Entrada, rather than trying to wiggle it in later – a particularly tricky task with cold fingers.

  • Bedrock Bags Entrada Handlebar Bag review
  • Bedrock Bags Entrada Handlebar Bag review

Build quality is top notch throughout. Construction-wise, the Entrada errs on the side of durability over gram saving. Materials are all reassuringly tough, webbing is military spec, and there’s a massive reinforced patch to protect errant levers from rubbing through the roll. It exudes burliness.

If I could think of an improvement, it would be the addition of bungee points at the top, in front of the handlebars, to make use of empty real estate – seems like a good spot to stash a layer. Personally, I’d appreciate the addition of a larger model in the range too, just because I tend to need the space on longer trips; in my case, running a rigid fork on a large frame means there’s no risk of tire rub.

Like all handlebar bags, you’ll probably want adjust the length of your cable housing, depending on the kind of bars you use for bikepacking. Given that I use a Rohloff Speedhub, I generally prefer to run the housing long, allowing the handlebar bag to slot behind all the cables, rather than risking scrunching cables and impairing long term shifting and braking. Others run the shifter cables short and the brakes long – it just depends on what works best for your setup.

  • Bedrock Bags Entrada Handlebar Bag review
  • Bedrock Bags Entrada Handlebar Bag review

On a general note, there’s pros and cons to this style of integrated handlebar bag. Compared to a harness system, which can accept a range of drybag sizes, it’s limited to a particular capacity. But it also provides an additional layer of repairable protection from scuffs and abrasion, and it offers easier on-the-bike access – I often stash items I need to access more regularly on either end of the tube.

Bedrock Bags Entrada Handlebar Bag review

Wrap Up

The Entrada certainly benefits from a few practice runs to hone its strapping system. But while it’s not the quickest bag to set up – at least until you’re well versed in its ways – it’s the most secure setup I’ve tried, making it particularly well suited to technical trails. Aside from boosting stability, the lateral compression straps also transform it into a veritable Tardis, even if its relatively lean cut will likely suit lightweight bikepacking, or those running a suspension fork with a small frame. Long distance expeditionists may feel a bit short changed – though the long cinch straps on the Pocket could easily be used to accommodate extra gear, like a tent or inflatable mattress. The zipper-free Pocket is an especially well considered touch, and really elevates the system. It’s easy to access on the move, largely weatherproof, and like the rest of the bag, should hold up to the toughest bikepacking trips you can throw at it.

  • WEIGHT15oz (425g)
  • PRICE $150
  • PLACE OF MANUFACTURE Colorado, USA
  • CONTACT Bedrock Bags

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  • Christophe Noel

    I really dig my Entrada bag. I have two, one narrower version for drop bars. They’re great.

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