All In Multitool Review: Crank tube stash…

The ultra-handy All In Multitool fits neatly into the hollow tube on most modern mountain bike cranksets and secures via magnets. We took it out on some rough and tumble trail rides to make sure it stays there…

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Inspired by tricks and hacks from old bike touring veterans, there is a growing class of tools designed to be stashed within the unused nooks and crannies on a bicycle. A few weeks ago we reviewed the similarly conceived Industry Nine Matchstix thru-axle tool. And here we present the All In Multitool, a clever bit driver kit that fits snugly inside the hollow space of crankset and stays there by way magnetic attraction to the steel axle.

All In Multitool, Crankset hollow tube multi-tool

The All In Multitool doesn’t have all the features that you’d expect in a typical folding multitool. There’s no chainbreaker, and it lacks a spoke tool and a few other necessities. But, it is a well-designed and very user friendly multi-angle bit driver. The tool has magnetized slots for six included bits — 3, 4, 5, and 6mm hex keys, plus a Phillips-head screwdriver and a Torx T25. The bits are standard hardware store grade steel, so you can customize which bits your bike requires. That said, in wet weather, the bits could start to rust given the low position inside the unsealed crankset tube. Although, you could probably coat them with a little gun oil or Bioshield to prevent oxidation. The All In Multitool also houses a master chain link. We found it to fit most 9, 10 and 11 speed split links but not the kidney-shaped 12spd Eagle links as they don’t seat within the recessed channel.

All In Multitool, Crankset hollow tube multi-tool

  • All In Multitool, Crankset hollow tube multi-tool
  • All In Multitool, Crankset hollow tube multi-tool
  • All In Multitool, Crankset hollow tube multi-tool
  • All In Multitool, Crankset hollow tube multi-tool
  • All In Multitool, Crankset hollow tube multi-tool

When it comes to feel and function, the All In Multitool is one of the better trail-carry mini tools available. When operated like a straight screwdriver it’s comfortable and easy to quickly tighten or loosen typical bolts. This is particularly nice when assembling and disassembling bikes for travel. The hinged driver can also be rotated to a 90º angle to allow additional leverage, or to access hard to reach bolts. It can also be rotated while in use for workarounds with awkward bolts. The tool’s round and generally heavy design also feels good in hand. And the textured end piece makes for a nice grip. My guess is that the All In Multitool will last quite a while. And for its price it should.

All In Multitool, Crankset hollow tube multi-tool

  • All In Multitool, Crankset hollow tube multi-tool
  • All In Multitool, Crankset hollow tube multi-tool

Within the tool’s colorfully anodized aluminum body, the All In Multitool has seven internal Neodynium magnets that hold it and all of its pieces in place — three to keep the six included bits intact, one to secure each half of a quick link, one to hold it in the crankset tube, and one in the bit driver, which not only secures the active bit in the driver, but also serves to stabilize the angle of the driver’s head. Although the strongest of the magnets does the bulk of the work, all of the magnets work together to help retain the tool within the bike.

All In Multitool, Crankset hollow tube multi-tool

The cylindrical tool fits inside most hollow crank axles with a 21mm or larger diameter. The force of attraction depends on the crankset design and how much aluminum separates the tool from the steel axle. Be advised that there are also cranks with which the All In Multitool won’t work. For example, there are some that use aluminum axles, such as the E13 TRS+, and others that might not have adequate space in the hollow tube. It’s best to confirm that your crankset is compatible with the tool before laying out the 86 Euros required to have it delivered. We tried the All In Multitool in several cranks including Eagle X01, an old Shimano Zee crank, and a Race Face Aeffect. It worked better in some than others. The Race Face seemed optimal, and the tool stuck pretty well in the SRAM Eagle X01 crank as well. The older model Zee crank didn’t have quite the connection though. However, it was still adequate as I took it on two overnighters in that crank with no issues. The biggest question we had was would it stay in place within the hollow crank tube when brought along on rough singletrack. I wasn’t so sure. However, after using it for a couple of months on a lot of trail rides and three different cranksets, I can say that it does in fact stay there.

All In Multitool Review

Pros

  • The All In Multitool is extremely easy to access.
  • Puts the weight as low and center as you can get.
  • Pivoting bit driver is easy to use and very versatile.
  • Solid and there to stay, so far.

Cons

  • No big 8mm allen bit for wrenching pedals (although I am not sure I’d trust the pivoting driver with such a high-torque duty).
  • Steel bits are prone to rust in that position.
  • It’s rather heavy for the few tools it gets you (still have to carry a chainbreaker, 8mm Allen key, etc.).
  • At €87.90 this is an expensive multitool, even with shipping included.
  • Weight 114 grams (4 ounces)
  • Place of Manufacture Italy
  • Price €87.90
  • Contact allinmultitool.co.uk

Wrap Up

The All In Multitool is another innovative solution to tool storage. While it’s lacking a lot of necessary functions, it’s a really handy bit driver. The beauty of it is how easy it is to access. The tool simply slides in and out of the crank tube and can be retrieved faster than any tool I’ve experienced. The biggest problem I see with the All In Multitool is its cost. One hundred bucks is a lot to pay for just an allen tool. But, if money’s no object and you like the idea of a solid and comfortable bit driver that’s stashed in the ideal location, you’ll likely appreciate the All In Multitool.

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